DIY Moulding and Painting in the Sunroom

We’re in the home stretch! This post is all about the finishing details I tackled myself. I chose to do this part to save a bit of money and because I wanted to be hands-on for at least some aspects of the space. Note: some of the DIY work happened before the painting crew arrived, which is why the window trim isn’t finished like you saw in my previous post.

I started by washing and painting the brick wall, which had gotten filthy during construction.

I used Benjamin Moore Regal Select, Chantilly Lace (same color as the trim) in the eggshell finish. When I painted this brick back in 2015 I used a semi-gloss, and I far prefer this new finish – it looks really soft.

I also painted the new drywall (same paint as the brick) and the beadboard ceiling. I know the ceiling looks white, but I swear it’s not. It’s Behr’s Irish Mist (color matched by Benjamin Moore), which is the same color as the walls throughout the rest of our house. This was my first time painting a ceiling a non-white color and I didn’t know what the effect would be – e.g. if it would make the ceiling seem lower, or if the color would appear darker on a horizontal surface.

I played it safe and went with a barely not-white color, thinking I could always repaint down the road. NOPE. Painting a beadboard ceiling is not fun – you have to roll and then back-brush to get into the grooves. If I ever want a new beadboard ceiling color, I’ll buy a new house.

I used a simple cove moulding for the moulding around the ceiling. This profile is nearly identical to the moulding in our mudroom, which is original.

I had my contractor include my crown and baseboard supplies in his window trim order. This worked out awesomely because it was delivered to our house in 16′ stretches, which would have been a challenge for me to haul with our Subaru.

This was baby’s first outside corner.

Please note the socks on the ladder legs, keeping my new floor safe from harm.

It was oddly hard to find details online about exactly how people caulk the gap between a beadboard ceiling and crown moulding. Maybe you’re thinking “Marti, that’s because it would be really boring blog content.”

Based on discussions I found online, other people are actually looking for information about this. So, buckle up, because I’m going to subject you to it.

I ran a line of caulk along the seam, like normal.

And then I ran a wet finger along the caulked seam (maybe lurid prose makes this content less boring).

That smoothed out the flat sections but created snow drifts of caulk in the beadboard grooves. I then dipped a cheap paintbrush in water and gently mashed the caulk into the grooves…

… which made it look both better and worse.

Finally, I ran my finger over the seam again to smooth it out, which made it look fully better.

I worked in ~3′ stretches around the room, and it actually went pretty quickly once I had figured out my technique. We went from this:

To this – ooooOOOOooooh!

If you’re glad this section is done, imagine how I felt. Onward and upward downward!

I used a simple oblong shoe moulding for the transition from the wood floor to the brick.

While I was down here, I turned my attention to the stone/concrete threshold between the living room and sunroom. While cleaning it, I realized the raised texture was adhesive residue – probably the same stick-on tiles they used on the sunroom floor.

I spent too much time scraping before deciding to break out the chemicals.

Acetone made much quicker work of this.

I also repaired a chipped corner that my shoe moulding wasn’t going to conceal.

I built out the corner with Bondo and then sanded it down.

The shoe moulding is installed with finishing nails, construction glue, and caulk. I used dumbbells and kettlebells to keep it in place while the glue dried – finally making good on my resolution to lift weights during quarantine.

Here’s the freshly painted threshold.

Fresssh.

For the drywall, I chose to use pilaster and cap moulding to match the original baseboard in our living room. It’s two pieces, which means I got to do twice as many complicated cuts.

I tackled the pilaster part early on. It went pretty quickly, though those outside corners were tricky for this first-timer.

My end boss was the base cap corners. The inside corner had to be coped.

And the outside corner had to be mitered. I am so dang proud of the finished product.

Have you ever seen anything so crisp? (If you have, don’t tell me. We all need a 2020 win, and this is mine.)

Annnnd we’re done! Thanks for sticking with me through these posts, especially given the beadboard caulking slog. Up next: the big reveal.

All the posts in this series:
•  Bungalow Window Decision Making
•  Sunroom Renovation Plans
•  Let’s Get Into Our Sunroom Renovation
•  Sunroom Renovation – Week 1
•  Sunroom Renovation – Week 2
•  Sunroom Renovation – Week 3
Sunroom Renovation – Floor Installation and Painting

2 thoughts on “DIY Moulding and Painting in the Sunroom”

  1. GREAT JOB, FANTASTIC LOOKING. YOUR SUGGESTIONS ARE GOOD. NEXT TIME, YOU MIGHT WANT TO USE A LITTLE SOAP ON YOUR FINGER BEFORE SMOOTHING THE CAULK. THE CORNERS ARE BEAUTIFUL. GLAD YOU HAD PATIENCE. DO YOU HAVE THE HISTORY OF OWNERSHIP ON YOUR 100 YEAR OLD HOUSE? (HOME) MAYBE FROM YOUR ABSTRACT? YOU COULD FRAME IT. MUCH LOVE, DAD

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